Riverside
3841 Jackson St Riverside, CA 92503
951-351-6900
Open 8:30 - 5:30 7days a week
Riverside/Canyon Crest
4377 Chicago Ave, Riverside, CA 92507
951-784-6777
Open 8:30 - 5:30 7days a week
Day

February 2, 2016

Citrus Hystrix (Kaffir Lime)

Citrus Hystrix Kaffir LimeFruit Ripens: Mar-June Description: Kaffir limes are unique to common limes in their shape, texture, fragrance and flavor. Their appearance is memorably ovate with a rounded bottom and conical stem end. The peel is rough, pebbled and filled with essential oils that give the lime its trademark aroma. The juice of the flesh is extremely tart and often bitter, thus it is seldom used in cooking.

Calamondin

Calamondin special citrusFruit Ripens: Dec-Sept Description: The Calamondin lime looks like a kumquat in size, shape and color. In tropical environments it may remain green when fully mature, but develops a rich orange color in most other climates. It has a very thin adherent skin with five to ten seeds and seven to nine segments. It is extremely tart and acidic even when fully ripe and should not be eaten whole like a kumquat. Rather, it is usually only used as a juicing citrus.

Australian Finger Lime

Australian Finger LimeFruit Ripens: Nov-Dec Description: Known as the caviar of citrus, these tiny digit shaped limes are practically in a category all their own. Their aromatic skin appears in a triad of colors and the flesh holds caviar-shaped vesicles that pop crisply in your mouth with an assertively tart punch. The flavor is a lemon lime combination with herbaceous undertones. Fruit pulp color intensifies during the last phase of fruit maturity. Do not let the aged skin tone deter you. If you wish to get the strongest color possible from your fruit, harvest fully matured fruit.

Minneola

Minneola TangeloFruit Ripens: Feb-Apr Description: Minneolas are around three to three and a half inches in diameter. They are round, but have a large, pronounced neck at the stem end. The rind is red-orange, mostly smooth, and easy to peel since it is relatively thin. The flesh is orange and has few seeds, although some fruits have many seeds. The ten to twelve segments inside contain flesh that is both sweet and tart, and juicy and rich in flavor.

Valentine

Valentine PummeloFruit Ripens: Jan-Mar Description: Valentine fruit was formally evaluated by the Citrus Variety Collection from January to March of years 2006, 2007, and 2008. Valentine fruit are round to somewhat pyriform in shape, usually with a slight to pronounced neck at the fruit base (stem end), but in some cases the neck is absent, resulting in a more typical spheroid grapefruit-like shape. The fruit apex (blossom end) is rounded and smooth. Rind color is medium to dark yellow for fruit harvested in Riverside in mid-February, with similar values for fruit harvested from the Lind-cove Research and Extension Center in Exeter. Valentine does have seeds, averaging somewhere in the 20's per fruit. The rind is moderately easy to peel when fruits are mature. ‘Valentine’ combines large size and low acidity from its pummelo parent, complex, floral taste from ‘Dancy,’ and juicy red pulp from ‘Ruby.’

Chandler (Pink Flesh)

Chandler PummeloFruit Ripens: Apr-Aug Description: Like other pomelos, Chandlers are very large for citrus. Chandlers are particularly large and round, with a yellow to yellow-pink rind. The flesh is light to dark pink and ricey in texture but still juicy. Seeds are usually present in abundance, but only when cross-pollinated by fertile citrus types. The flavor is mostly sweet with some acidic notes, and Chandler pulp may even have contrasting tastes in different sections.

Washington Navel (Seedless)

Washington navel orangeFruit Ripens: Jan-May Description: Washington navel orange is also known as the Bahia for the Brazilian city from which it was imported into the United States in 1870. Although its origins are uncertain, it is believed to come from a bud sport found in a Selecta orange tree in the early 1800s. Upon its arrival at the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Washington, D.C. it was propagated and trees were sent to California and Florida. Although the Florida trees did not flourish, those sent to Eliza Tibbets in Riverside, California found an ideal climate for their culture. These exceptionally delicious, seedless, easy-peeling fruits quickly attracted the attention of citrus growers, and within a decade the "Washington" navel orange, as it came to be known, was the most widely planted variety in the area.

Valencia (Mid knight) (Seedless)

Valencia orangesFruit Ripens: Apr-Oct Description: The Valencia orange is a large orange variety with a smooth and pebbled surface and a semi thick fragrant peel that clings loosely to its segmented and barely seeded flesh. Its flesh, when ripe, is supremely sweet, juicy and tender. Though Valencia oranges' primary usage is for juicing, they are also used for fresh eating as well.

Red Valencia

Red Valencia orangesFruit Ripens: Jan- Apr Description: The Valencia orange is a large orange variety with a smooth and pebbled surface and a semi thick fragrant peel that clings loosely to its segmented and barely seeded flesh. Its flesh, when ripe, is supremely sweet, juicy and tender. Though Valencia oranges' primary usage is for juicing, they are also used for fresh eating as well.

Moro Blood (Red Flesh)

Moro Blood OrangesFruit Ripens: Feb-May
Description: Moro is the most intensely colored of the blood oranges, owing its distinctive flesh color and rind blush to the presence of anthocyanin, the same pigment found in purple grapes. The fruit is moderate in size and often grows in clusters. The rind is medium in thickness. The flesh is dark violet red, generously juicy and sweet tart in flavor.